THE SCHOTT FAMILY - From Cincinnati 
(& Germany)
THE UNION OF THE RIEDLIN & SCHOTT FAMILIES

In 1914, Lucia Riedlin, the daughter of William Riedlin who operated and owned what became the Bavarian Brewing Co. from 1882 until 1919, married William Charles (Will) Schott.  Will was  the son of Johan Michal (J.M.) Schott Schott who operated a Cincinnati cooperage established in the early 1870s.  This union between the Riedlin and Schott families established an involvement in this Bavarian Brewery between 1882 and 1965, for over 83 years. The following provides some background about the J.M. Schott and William C. Schott families. The Wm. Riedlin Family is examined in another section.

 

 

THE J. M. SCHOTT FAMILY

J.M. Schott emigrated from the Franconia area of Bavaria, Germany, to New York City in 1866. With a background in cooperage (barrel making) he found a job with Schaefer Brewing for a couple of years. It was there that he met a son Christian Moerlein, who was an apprentice at that brewer, who told J.M. about a cooperage opportunity at Moerlein's.  J.M. moved his family to Cincinnati around 1870 (about the same time William Riedlin arrived in Cincinnati), and both men and their families lived in the Over The Rhine (OTR) area in the 1870s.  After leaving Moerlein after only a year or two, J. M. Schott established a saloon and Taffel and Straight Street, just north of the OTR. Shortly thereafter, he established a cooperage firm next to the saloon. All ofThis became a family business that provided employment for all of J.M.'s five sons. Besides having five sons, J.M. also had two daughters that survived childhood.  A family picture is on the side. 

THE J. M. SCHOTT & SONS COOPERAGE CO.

After J.M. passed away in 1903, his sons became known as the Schott Brothers and formed the Cincinnati Galvanizing Co. next to their cooperage firm off of McMicken and Strait Streets in 1905. The youngest brother, Will, worked at both companies in his youth, but aspired to become a doctor. He graduated from the University of Cincinnati with a A.B. degree in 1905 and was admitted to Medical School in that same year. However, his brothers were having some challenges with the galvanizing business. With his education, including some knowledge of chemistry, Will dropped out of medical college in 1908 with  became the General Manager of the galvanizing business.

Pine Meer, 5330 Cleves-Warsaw Pike

This estate is reduced in size from nearly 100 acres to only a few acres today.

THE SCHOTT BROTHERS

After J.M. passed away in 1903, his sons became known as the Schott Brothers and formed the Cincinnati Galvanizing Co. next to their cooperage firm off of McMicken and Strait Streets in 1905. The youngest brother, Will, worked at both companies in his youth, but aspired to become a doctor. He graduated from the University of Cincinnati with a A.B. degree in 1905 and was admitted to Medical School in that same year. However, his brothers were having some challenges with the galvanizing business. With his education, including some knowledge of chemistry, Will dropped out of medical college in 1908 with  became the General Manager of the galvanizing business.

PINE MEER

In 1922 William and Lucia Riedlin Schott started to build a home on the west side of Cincinnati. It was on a site....

WM. C. SCHOTT & LUCIA RIEDLIN

Around 1910, Wililam C. Schott had apparently became acquainted with Lucia Riedlin, as he gave her a birthday gift at that time. Four years later, on September 30, 1914, Lucia Riedlin married Will (as Lucia called him) at the William Riedlin home, at 925 Main Street. A reception followed for 100 plates at the Bavarian Rathskeller. The first home the couple lived in was on the corner of University Court and Strait Street next to the University of Cincinnati (U.C.), just up the hill from where Will had lived and worked. Both Will and Lucia were the youngest children in their families.  

Will's Involvement with Bavarian Brewery

After the brewery was acquired by Will and three of his brothers in 1937, each of them were President of the brewery over the next 17 years. Then Will's son was in charge of the brewery for over a decade. However, Will was never President of the brewery over this period. Perhaps it was because he was briefly President of the Riedlin Beverage Co. and brewery in the 1920s during Prohibition, even though the brewery wasn't operating. Or, possibly he didn't have the desire to hold that position. Being the youngest in his family, he may have thought it was more appropriate for his older brothers to hold the title of President. In addition, he was General Manager and essentially in charge of another business his family owned, the Cincinnati Galvanizing Co.  He may not have wanted or needed to be technically in charge of the brewery.  However, he was the only one in his family who not only completed college, but had advanced education, completing three years of medical school, all at the University of Cincinnati.

William and Emma lived at this home for the rest of their lives.  Unfortunately a few years before they moved, their first child Emma passed away from typhoid. This was very difficult for the family. In remembrance of her they had a large stain glass image of Emma placed in the main stairwell of their home, which was also visible from the entrance. 

BAVARIAN BREWING CO., INC. IS ESTABLISHED

In 1889, John Meyer decided to retire from the brewing business. William acquired control of the brewery and incorporated it similar to its former name, Bavarian Brewing Co., Inc. (referred to herein as Bavarian).  William served as its President, Anton Ruh was the brew master and Vice President and J. H. Kruse was the Secretary/Treasurer. (Please see Letterheads.) These men were all with the Meyer and Riedlin Brewery, and are depicted in the above photo. Under this management, Bavarian expanded rapidly as the company saw demand for its products, particularly in Northern Kentucky, surpass its supply. Bavarian added a new bottling facility around 1892.  Shortly afterwards, construction also included a malt house with a 30,000 bushel capacity and a 31-ton refrigeration plant that produced 100 tons of ice per week. The ice house was used to help cool and ferment the company's lager beer, but it was built to provide more ice than the company needed. This excess capacity not only allowed Bavarian to sell ice to the local neighborhood, but it supplied saloons with ice in exchange for selling Bavarian beverages. It wasn't long before Bavarian was second in production capacity in Northern Kentucky to only Wiedemann, located nearby in Newport, KY. 

 

William and Emma lived at this home for the rest of their lives.  Unfortunately a few years before they moved, their first child Emma passed away from typhoid. This was very difficult for the family. In remembrance of her they had a large stain glass image of Emma placed in the main stairwell of their home, which was also visible from the entrance. 

Bavarian embarked on some major expansion to meet demand at the turn of the 20th Century. In 1903 the bottling department was replaced with a two-story structure that measure 45 x 141 feet and a stable for the delivery horses was added that measured 46 by 188 feet. In 1905 the expansion continued with combination four-story stock and wash house measuring 175 x 124 feet at a cost of $150,000, which was opened in January, 1906. These structures were modern in every detail and allowed Bavarian to grow.  Below is a 1902 picture of Bavarian workers, taken just before this major expansion occurred. 

A year after the Riedlin's arrived in Covington with their daughter and son, they had another daughter, Mary Anna Marie (Mamie) Riedlin. Then four years later they had another son Walter F., and three years after that, their last child Lucia (Lucy) was born. So, shortly after William established Bavarian Brewery, his family consisted of two sons and three daughters, along with his mother-in-law, Mary Hoffman Karweise. The family lived next to the brewery on 12th Street (also known as Martin Luther King Blvd. today) up until about 1899. Then they moved to a new home they had built at 925 Main Street, shown on the right. This structure, and a carriage house behind it, both still stand today.  

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